Frequently Asked Question

How can I create a new Pay Rate?
Last Updated 2 years ago

Navigate to Set Up then Pay Scales.
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Next you need to find the client or group you want to add a pay rate to. Select them once you've found it, then check the Show All Grades box if the pay band you're looking for isn't in the list. Select the pay band once you've found it.
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Click the blue Create New Pay Rate button, then type in a memorable, meaningful name into the box that pops up. It would be a good idea to add the pay band onto the name so that you can easily find it in future.
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Once you've given the pay rate a name, this screen will pop up. Here you must select the types of shift you want to add to the rate. After you've selected all the required shifts, click the Refresh button to ensure that all shift types have been loaded into the yellow list. Click Exit once you're done.
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You will be brought back to the pay rates screen, from here, select your newly created rate in the drop down list at the bottom of the page.
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There will now be a blank rate list loaded into the bottom list. From here you can enter in the rates for each shift type.
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The Rate 2 column is for PAYE staff, the Rate 4 column is for Limited staff. The CHARGE column is the rate that the client pays per hour.
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The NI and WTR percentages will be empty, to quickly fill these with your default values, go to Rates, then click Apply Standard Rates To All. This will then fill the empty NI and WTR columns with the default values that are set in the system. You may need to refresh the screen by selecting the pay band again to be able to see the percentages.
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After you're happy with all of the rates, you can load them against the pay band by clicking the green Load Pay Rates button.
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The second part of setting up the pay rate is making sure that the shift time periods are correct. This part of the pay rate determines what time of day each shift type is applied over a 24 hour period.
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In our example, you can see that there are 2 days that cover the whole 24 hour period. You can have your pay rate set up like this if you don't need to pay different rates for day and night, but if you do need to pay different rates for days and nights then you will need to split the shift type in two, one for the day rate and one for the night rate.
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If you need to create two new shift types, go back to Pay Rates, then click the Edit Pay Default button at the bottom of the page.
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The first thing you need to do is get rid of the shifts that will conflict with your two new ones, in this case it is the Saturday and Sunday shifts. To delete them, just select the shift then click the Delete Shift button.
To add the new shifts you must check them in the list on the right. (Please note, there may be a slight delay on the shift types appearing, so you may need to click the refresh button to properly load all of the newly added shifts).
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Click the pay band you were working on to see if the changes have been made. You should now see the new shifts in the default list, from here you will need to fill in the details of the shift times, and apply the standard rates to the NI and WTR again. To load your updated pay rates, you must first get rid of the outdated ones, to do this, click the Delete Pay Rates button. This button will remove the pay rate from the pay band only, it will not delete it from the pay rates list.
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Re-select the pay rates from the drop down box, then click the green Load Pay Rates button to load the updated rates.
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You may need to adjust the timings on the shift details as previously explained, if the defaults are correct you can leave it alone.
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The final thing you must do is select the rate type. Select PUBLIC if the client is in the public sector, select PRIVATE is the client is in the private sector. You must complete this part as it is for compliance with the recent IR35 legislation. This ensures that employees are being taxed at the correct rates when working with your various clients. For example, if you have a limited employee who works with private and public clients, when they work for a private client they will be taxed as they usually are, but when they work for a public client they will be taxed at source.
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